CBD 101: Hemp Botany I

Is Hemp Cannabis?

You may not know that hemp and cannabis are mostly considered the same plant. The distinction between the two is entirely a legal definition. Hemp becomes cannabis when it contains more than .3% THC. This chemical composition determines the way the growers cultivate the plant, its legal status, and its use. Both plants belong to the family, Cannabaceae, and genus Cannabis.

Cannabaceae

Members of the Cannabaceae family have several well-defined characteristics. Two defining characteristics are their status as both vascular and dioecious plants.

Most plants are vascular, and the few non-vascular plant types, such as bryophytes and some types of algae, are the evolutionary precursors to the vascular plants seen today.

Vascular plants have specialized tissues for moving materials through the plant. The xylem draws water and dissolved nutrients upward. In contrast, the phloem pulls sugars, amino acids, and other photosynthetic products from the leaves in a process called translocation.

Vascular plant classification further divides into how plants fertilize their seeds. If an ovary encloses the seed, then it is an angiosperm. If seeds develop without enclosure, then the plant classifies as a gymnosperm. Hemp, as a flowering plant with enclosed seed development, is an angiosperm.

Hemp Reproduction

Additionally, Dioecious means that the hemp plant develops either male or female sex organs. Female hemp plants are referred to as pistillate because they have pistils, which are female plant organs. On the other hand, male hemp plants are categorized as staminate. The male plant has stamens, the pollen-producing organ of the flower.

If a male plant sheds its pollen, the pollen will fertilize any surrounding pistillate plants, which will then produce seeds. When this fertilization occurs, the female plant will spend all of its energy on producing seeds instead of cannabinoids. Growers can manipulate female plants into flowering longer. Removing male plants from the nearby area helps female plants produce more cannabinoids and trichomes.

Try It Today

We test all of our hemp-derived products so that you know what you are buying. Navigate to our Labs page to find out more. CBD Plus USA carries a variety of all-natural, hemp-derived products. Our CBD exceeds the industry standard of quality as we produce carefully extracted, pesticide-free, and non-GMO products. For more information about our products, visit the Products page on our website.

Live your best life with CBD Plus USA!

CBD 101: Cannabidiol

What is Cannabidiol?

For starters, you might want to know that CBD is short for cannabidiol. CBD is not hemp oil; it is a cannabinoid. Among another notable compounds, cannabidiol is one of the most abundant cannabinoids found in hemp.

More specifically, cannabinoids classify as chemical compounds. They can be found naturally in the body. We know them as endocannabinoids. In contrast, the compounds found in the hemp plant fall under the name of phytocannabinoids. (The “phyto-” part is a Greek word meaning “plant.”) Scientists have identified at least 113 cannabinoids in the hemp plant. When phytocannabinoids enter the body, they have a similar effect as endocannabinoids. These direct and indirect interactions give the body a boost.

Is Cannabidiol like THC?

CBD differs from THC in a big way. THC binds with receptors (CB1 and CB2) typically found in the brain and central nervous system. This interaction typically causes intoxication, giving that sense “high” that we associate with THC. On the other hand, the method of how CBD affects the human body in a more indirect way and is still under study. Our current understanding illustrates CBD as an ultimately beneficial supplement for the proactive lifestyle.

History of Cannabidiol

The history of cannabidiol starts more than half a century ago. The structure of CBD was first isolated and explained in 1963 by Israeli chemist Dr. Raphael Mechoulam and his team of researchers. CBD begins in the form, CBDa. (The “A” in CBDa stands for acid. Cannabidiolic acid.) It transforms into CBD through the process of decarboxylation. CBD alone does not directly bind to CB1 or CB2 receptors in the body. Instead, it modifies non-cannabinoid receptors and ion channels. As a result, it stands unique among other cannabinoids.

Try It Today

Now you can see, CBD offers a lot more to discover than we currently know. Try CBD for yourself; it may work for you. CBD Plus USA carries a variety of all-natural hemp-derived products. Our CBD exceeds the industry standard of quality as we produce carefully extracted, pesticide-free, and non-GMO products. For more information about our products, visit the Products page on our website.

Live your best life with CBD Plus USA!